excess IRA contribution | Ed Slott and Company, LLC

excess IRA contribution

Anomalies and Exceptions

As already-complicated IRA rules spiral further into an abyss of confusion, it comes as no surprise that irregularities exist. Up is down and left is right. Green means stop, red means throw your hands up in exasperation.

5 Ways Excess IRA Contributions Happen

You can have too much of a good thing. While it is a good strategy to contribute to an IRA, some contributions are not allowed. When a contribution is not permitted in an IRA, it is an excess contribution and needs to be fixed. Some excess contributions are pretty easy to understand. Others are a little more complicated. Here are 5 ways an excess IRA contribution can happen:

Poison Ivy: IRA Scenarios to Avoid

I got into some poison ivy and am suffering the consequences. It takes a few days for the welts to appear, but they are in full bloom. While I did take precautions before starting my yardwork (gloves, long sleeve shirt, etc.), in retrospect I could have been more careful. The frustrating part is, there isn’t a whole lot you can do once the swelling appears. Ice, some anti-itch spray, try not to scratch too much, and just methodically work through this incredibly uncomfortable irritation.

3 Tips for Making Your 2022 IRA Contribution

Tax season is in full swing. That means that the 2022 tax-filing deadline is not far away. Are you considering making a 2022 IRA contribution? Time is quickly running out. Here are three tips to help you get your contribution done the right way. 1. DON’T Miss the Deadline. The deadline for making your 2022 IRA contribution is the tax-filing deadline, Tuesday, April 18, 2023. Do you have an extension? That won’t buy you more time. Even if you have an extension for filing your 2022 federal income taxes, your deadline for making a traditional or Roth IRA contribution is still April 18, 2023.

SECURE 2.0 Eliminates Penalty on NIA

SECURE 2.0 is a mammoth piece of legislation that contains over 90 provisions that affect retirement accounts. While many of these provisions are not game changers, they still can be very helpful to specific groups of retirement savers. One of these is the provision that eliminates the 10% early distribution penalty that applies to net income attributable (NIA) when an excess IRA contribution is corrected by withdrawal.

Inherited IRAs and Roth IRA Contributions: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hi, I have read with interest, Ian Berger's article titled "IRS Waives 50% Penalty for Missed 2021 and 2022 RMDs within the 10-Year Period." I am glad that this is starting to be clarified by the IRS. Has any guidance been provided yet on how to calculate the future RMDs?

The Las Vegas Conference

The Ed Slott team hosted a highly successful training program for members of our Elite and Master Elite Advisor groups last week in Las Vegas. Over 300 financial advisors from across the country attended. Feedback on the educational material provided was positive, with one attendee saying he “never felt more empowered” in his 18-year career.

October 17 is the Deadline to Correct 2021 Excess IRA Contributions Without Penalty

Maybe you made a Roth IRA contribution for 2021, but your income was too high. Maybe you made a traditional IRA contribution without having any earned income. These are both examples of excess IRA contributions. The bad news is that excess IRA contributions happen can easily and often. The good news is that if you properly correct the contribution, you can avoid penalties.

5 Ways an Excess IRA Contribution Can Happen

You can have too much of a good thing. While saving for retirement with an IRA is a good strategy, there are limits. When a contribution is not permitted in an IRA, it is an excess contribution and needs to be fixed. Here are 5 ways an excess IRA contribution can happen to you:

FIX/NO FIX – Correcting Retirement Transactions, and Those That are Lost

FIX: Rolling Over the Tax Withheld on a Distribution. Was the mandatory tax of 20% withheld on your work plan withdrawal even though you intended to roll over the entire account? Did you change your mind on an IRA withdrawal and now want to roll it back, but you elected to have taxes withheld on the initial distribution? If money was withheld for taxes on a distribution from a work plan or an IRA and you want to roll over the distribution plus taxes withheld, you can make up the difference “out-of-pocket.” The money withheld and sent to the IRS is gone, but you can replace that withholding with other dollars, roll over the full amount, and have a credit waiting for you for the amount withheld when you do your taxes next year.

Content Citation Guidelines

Below is the required verbiage that must be added to any re-branded piece from Ed Slott and Company, LLC or IRA Help, LLC. The verbiage must be used any time you take text from a piece and put it onto your own letterhead, within your newsletter, on your website, etc. Verbiage varies based on where you’re taking the content from.

Please be advised that prior to distributing re-branded content, you must send a proof to [email protected] for approval.

For white papers/other outflow pieces:
Copyright © [year of publication], [Ed Slott and Company, LLC or IRA Help, LLC - depending on what it says on the original piece] Reprinted with permission [Ed Slott and Company, LLC or IRA Help, LLC - depending on what it says on the original piece] takes no responsibility for the current accuracy of this information.

For charts:
Copyright © [year of publication], Ed Slott and Company, LLC Reprinted with permission Ed Slott and Company, LLC takes no responsibility for the current accuracy of this information.

For Slott Report articles:
Copyright © [year of article], Ed Slott and Company, LLC Reprinted from The Slott Report, [insert date of article], with permission. [Insert article URL] Ed Slott and Company, LLC takes no responsibility for the current accuracy of this article.

Please contact Matt Smith at [email protected] or (516) 536-8282 with any questions.

 

Find members of Ed Slott's Elite IRA Advisor GroupSM in your area.
We neither keep nor share your information entered on this form.
 

I agree to the terms and services:

You may review the terms and conditions here.