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LIFETIME AND INHERITED IRA RMD RULES: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: If a person turned 72 in 2022, and died before starting her traditional IRA RMDs (required minimum distributions), must her three children take an RMD (based on their ages) in 2022 and for the next 9 years?

SECURE 2.0 Changes Already in Effect

The SECURE 2.0 Act, enacted into law on December 29, 2022, makes over 90 changes to the IRA and employer plan tax rules. If that isn’t enough, many of these provisions aren’t immediately effective and (one isn’t effective until 2033). This article will focus on the key provisions in effect right now in 2023:

SECURE 2.0 Allows Rollovers of 529 Funds to Roth IRAs

We’re getting a lot of questions about the SECURE 2.0 provision allowing tax-free rollovers from 529 plans to Roth IRAs. Although this new rollover opportunity sounds exciting, there are a number of restrictions that may limit its appeal. Section 529 plans offer a great opportunity to pay for college, K-12 tuition and student loan repayments. Nearly every state offers at least one plan. The most popular type of 529 plans are college savings plans, in which you make after-tax contributions that are invested in mutual funds or ETFs offered under the plan.

RMDs Under SECURE Act 2.0: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: On reading your SECURE 2.0 information, a revised RMD (required minimum distribution) to age 73 was mentioned. Prior to this new legislation, 72 was the RMD age. If this is in effect now in 2023, is it correct that if you turn 72 in 2023, you won’t be required to take an RMD in 2023? Based on what I’ve read, the first RMD for a 72 year-old in 2023 would be pushed to age 73 in 2024? Thanks in advance for your insights!

SECURE 2.0 Changes That Apply to Workplace Plans

In our December 28 and January 2 Slott Report articles, we focused mostly on the provisions of the new SECURE 2.0 law that apply to IRAs. But many of the law’s changes are directed towards workplace plans, such as 401(k)s. Here’s a rundown of the most important plan changes:

Congress Considers Spending Bill That Includes SECURE 2.0

As you may have read, Congress is considering passage of a $1.65 trillion spending bill that contains a number of retirement savings plan provisions. As of this morning (December 21), the bill has not been passed, and both houses of Congress only have until this Friday (December 23) to do so. If passed, President Biden is expected to sign the bill immediately.

INHERITED ROTH IRA BENEFICIARY RULES AND PAYOUT OPTIONS FOR ELIGIBLE DESIGNATED BENEFICIARIES: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: Do adult children who inherited a parent’s Roth IRA in 2020 need to take an RMD each year during the 10-year payout rule or may they leave it alone and deplete the account at the end of the 10th year? I’ve heard it both ways and would like to know which is correct. Thank you. Pam

Big Increase in Many 2023 Retirement Plan Contribution Limits

The IRS has announced the retirement contribution limits for 2023. Because many of these limits are tied to inflation, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that some of the limits had a big jump. Here’s a summary:

A Refresher Course on Multiple Plan Contribution Limits

As you’ve probably heard, the IRS has announced the IRA and workplace plan contribution limits for 2023. Because most of those limits are tied to inflation, many increased substantially. Among the big jumps were the elective deferral limit for 401(k) and other workplace plans from $20,500 to $22,500 and the overall limit for all plan contributions from $61,000 to $66,000.

Deadline for Opening Up a New Solo 401(k) Plan

A solo 401(k) plan is a great retirement savings vehicle for self-employed business owners with no employees (other than their spouse). But if you’re considering a new solo 401(k), be aware that there’s a December 31, 2022 deadline to open up the plan if you want to make 2022 elective deferrals.

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