RMD | Ed Slott and Company, LLC

RMD

RMD Trivia

True or False? “It is mathematically impossible for an IRA account owner to have his first required minimum distribution (RMD) be due for the year 2020.” Here’s why this statement is true. First, we are not talking about inherited IRAs. If the account owner died in 2019, then the first RMD for the beneficiary needs to be taken by December 31, 2020. Inherited IRAs do not fit this statement. Next, we are not talking about workplace retirement plans – like a 401(k). The reason this statement does not apply to a 401(k) is because of the pesky “still-working” exception. If a plan has the still-working exception feature and an older employee separates from service in calendar year 2020, then the first RMD will also be due for 2020.

The SECURE Act and RMDs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hi Ed, Question on the new SECURE Act: Do you know if there were any changes to the payout period if an estate is the beneficiary of an IRA. Is it still a 5-year payout? Or is it now 10? Thanks, appreciate your help. Janet Answer: Dear Janet, The SECURE Act made lots of changes to the IRA rules. But one change it did not make is to the payout rules when the estate -- or any other non-individual (except for certain trusts) – is the IRA beneficiary. As was the case before the SECURE Act, the required distribution depends on whether the owner dies before the owner’s “required beginning date.” That date is April 1 of the year after the year in which the owner attains age 72. If the owner dies before the required beginning date, the entire account must be paid out by December 31 of the fifth year following death. If the owner dies on or after that date, annual required distributions must be made over the remaining life expectancy of the owner (had he lived) under the IRS Single Life Expectancy Table.

2020 Life Tables and RMDs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hoping you might be able to offer some guidance. We have a client who has two IRA accounts. The client is 80 years of age. He wants to convert the full amount in one of his IRA accounts to a Roth. The IRS says that distributions from IRA accounts are treated as satisfying the RMD first, so we need to take the RMD before we process the conversion. My questions are: 1.) The client has plenty of money in IRA #2 to satisfy the RMD for both IRA accounts. I presume that doesn't matter and we still need to take the RMD before we convert? 2.) Is the RMD that must be satisfied ONLY the RMD for IRA #1 that we plan to convert to a Roth, or is the RMD that must be satisfied the aggregate of both IRA accounts that must be met before we convert IRA #1 to a Roth? Thank you. Jamie

Roth Contributions and RMDs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hi Ed, Hope all is well. I have a client that received the HEART benefit as her spouse passed away a few years ago. We immediately moved those dollars into a Roth for her. My question is, as we are doing some year-end planning, can I add to this Roth by doing a conversion, or do I need to open up a separate Roth for her? Answer: The HEART Act allows a beneficiary of military death gratuities to contribute those funds to a Roth IRA. The Roth contribution can be made without regard to the annual contribution or income limits. The contribution must be done within

8 DAYS FOR 6 YEAR-END TRANSACTIONS

As of the writing of this Slott Report submission, it is Monday, December 23, 2019. T-minus 8 days before the end of the year, which means IRA owners have a tight window to complete any year-end transactions. Once the calendar turns, if not finalized in time, some items will be forever lost. Here are six transactions that absolutely must be completed within the next 8 days to avoid penalty and/or a lost opportunity: Over 70 ½ RMDs. While the first RMD for the year a person turns 70 ½ can be delayed until April 1 of the next year, all future RMDs must be taken before the end of the calendar year. There is no wiggle room.

QCDs and Inherited IRAs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: As year-end approaches, I have just exceeded my 2019 RMD, combining total QCD's during the year and my regular monthly IRA withdrawals. If I make additional charitable contributions from my IRA this month, are they still considered tax-advantaged QCD's, or has my QCD opportunity ended because I've already exceeded the annual RMD? Answer: This is an area where there is a lot of confusion! While you can use a qualified charitable distribution (QCD) to count toward your required minimum distribution (RMD), your QCDs for the year are not limited to the amount of your RMD.

AGGREGATING IRAs AND RMD CALCULATIONS: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: I am over 71 and have 2 IRAs, one in my name, the other is inherited. Can I take one RMD from the inherited IRA to satisfy both? Or must I treat them separately and do 2 separate RMDs? Thank you! Tyler Answer: Hi Tyler, You must treat the IRAs separately and take two separate RMDs. If you own more than one IRA (not inherited), you can aggregate them and take the RMD from any one (or more) of them.

IRA Rollovers and Required Minimum Distributions: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: I am still working at age 71 and don't really need the required minimum distributions (RMDs) from my rollover IRA. The IRA was funded largely with distributions from a tax-qualified pension plan and a tax-qualified 401(k) plan. Some deductible contributions were made many years ago as well. I would like to transfer some of the IRA into my current employer's 401(k) so as to reduce RMDs until I terminate my employment with my current employer. I am not a 5% owner of the company, so I don't currently have to take RMDs from the 401(k).

Top 10 RMD Goofs, Gaffes and Blunders

People stumble over themselves all the time. Bad advice is provided, misinformation gets freely disseminated, and sometimes normally smart individuals do less-than-smart things. Stories of good folks fouling up their required minimum distribution are rife. After all, the RMD rules contain a veritable minefield of traps and potential tripping hazards. Based on nothing more than personal experience, anecdotal evidence and conversations with industry insiders, here is a Top 10 list of RMD Goofs, Gaffes and Blunders: 10. Rolling over an RMD. RMDs are not eligible to be rolled over. This happens most frequently when company plan assets are rolled over to an IRA. If the RMD is not taken first, you now have an excess contribution in the IRA that needs to be corrected.

Using NUA for an RMD – 3 Steps

Many company retirement plans – like a 401(k) – offer company stock as an investment option. Under special tax rules, a plan participant can withdraw the stock and pay regular (ordinary) income tax on it, but only on the original cost and not on the market value, i.e., what the shares are worth on the date of the distribution. The difference (the appreciation) is called the net unrealized appreciation (NUA). NUA is the increase in the value of the employer stock from the time it was acquired to the date of the distribution to the plan participant. The plan participant can elect to defer the tax on the NUA until he sells the stock. When he does sell, he will only pay tax at his current long-term capital gains rate – even if the stock is held for less than one year. To qualify for the tax deferral on NUA, the distribution must be a lump-sum distribution. This means the entire plan must be emptied in one calendar year, including all non-company stock within the plan.

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