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roth conversion

REPAYMENT OF UNWANTED RMDS AND ROTH CONVERSIONS FROM COMPANY PLANS: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: For COVID "special" Aug 31 rollovers, am I allowed to return my 401(k) required minimum distribution (RMD) to my IRA? Thank you, Maria Answer: Hi Maria, Yes, the CARES Act and subsequent IRS guidance allows unwanted

Roth Conversions: Paying Taxes from Another Source

The King of the Land wanted to send 100,000 of his greatest warriors off to battle. However, he was told that 20,000 of the warriors needed to remain behind to protect the castle. The King of the Land did not like this news. He wanted a full complement of soldiers in the fight. So, the King of the Land decided to send all 100,000 warriors off to battle, and he used an additional 20,000 warriors from another army to protect the castle. The investor wanted to convert $200,000 of his traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. However, it was recommended that he withhold 24% for taxes. The investor did not want to send only $152,000 to his Roth.

ROTH Conversions and Qualified Charitable Distributions: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

An initial ROTH conversion was completed in 2018 for tax year 2018. A second conversion was completed in 2019 for tax year 2019. There was no ROTH IRA account prior to 2018 and the account owner is over 59 ½. The 5-year holding period will be satisfied on 1/1/2023. Does each ROTH conversion transaction have a separate 5-year clock to determine whether earnings are tax free or is it just the initial transaction? Thank you in advance for your assistance. Dan Answer: Dan, For those under the age of 59 ½, yes, each Roth conversion has its own 5-year clock. However, the account holder you are inquiring about is already over 59 ½. As such (and since this is his very first Roth IRA account), he only has to concern himself with the 5-year clock on the 2018 conversion.

8 DAYS FOR 6 YEAR-END TRANSACTIONS

As of the writing of this Slott Report submission, it is Monday, December 23, 2019. T-minus 8 days before the end of the year, which means IRA owners have a tight window to complete any year-end transactions. Once the calendar turns, if not finalized in time, some items will be forever lost. Here are six transactions that absolutely must be completed within the next 8 days to avoid penalty and/or a lost opportunity: Over 70 ½ RMDs. While the first RMD for the year a person turns 70 ½ can be delayed until April 1 of the next year, all future RMDs must be taken before the end of the calendar year. There is no wiggle room.

Roth IRAs and the Backdoor Roth Conversion: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hello. I am an avid reader. Thank you for the information you provide. About opening/establishing a Roth IRA: I opened my 1st and only Roth IRA on April 12 of 2018 at the age of 59 ½, funding it with an initial deposit and designating that deposit as a 2017 deposit/contribution. In August of 2018 I made a 2nd deposit as my 2018 Roth IRA contribution. Does the 5-year rule (to withdraw earnings tax free) begin in 2017 or 2018? Does the 5-year rule start on April 12, the actual date of the Roth IRA establishment, or does the date default to January 1st regardless of the actual establishment date? Thanks again, Jeff Answer: Jeff, The start date for your Roth IRA is officially January 1, 2017.

Roth Conversions and the 60-Day Rollover Rule: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hello Ed, I have received differing views on making a 401(k) conversion to a Roth IRA. I'm a 64 year old retired federal employee and plan to transfer all my funds from the TSP to my traditional IRA. From there I plan to make annual conversions to my long established Roth IRA. Is there an issue with the five-year rule that would prevent me from being able to make withdrawals from the Roth during the next few years? Thanks for your help. Dan Answer: Hi Dan, Your plan works! You can roll over your TSP to a traditional IRA and make series of conversions to a Roth IRA without worries about taxes and penalties on any Roth distributions. How is this possible? Well, all your converted funds can be accessed tax and penalty free because you are over age 59 ½.

QCDs and Roth Conversions: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Hello, I’ve been a follower of Ed’s expertise for over 10 years. The information has always been helpful and clearly explained. At this time, I’m looking to help a client minimize her taxes. She recently inherited an IRA from her father. She has taken the “Stretch IRA” option and is now receiving her required distributions. Can she utilize a Qualified Charitable Distribution to her church (verified 501c3) to reduce her tax liability and still maintain the stretch IRA? Answer: Yes. Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCDs) are available to beneficiaries.

Roth Conversions and Stretch IRAs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Could you please direct me to information that tells me how any conversions I make from my regular IRA to a Roth will be taxed. My belief was that the amount of any conversion will be taxed at whatever my tax bracket is for the year in which I make the conversion. Is that correct? Therefore, all other things being equal, it is preferable to make the conversion in years where my tax bracket is lower. Thanks for your help. Joann Answer: Joann, You are 100% correct. Any conversion from a traditional to a Roth IRA will be taxed at your tax bracket for the year in which you make the conversion. (One is not allowed to make a “prior year conversion.”) As for your second comment – also yes.

This Week's Q&A Mailbag: Roth IRA Contributions and Distributions

This week's Q&A Mailbag answers reader questions on Roth IRA contributions and distributions.

5 Roth IRA Facts That May Surprise You

Do you think you understand all the rules that govern your Roth IRA? Not so fast! There are many misconceptions as to how these complicated accounts work. Here are 5 Roth IRA facts that might surprise you.

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