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Roth IRA

Roth IRA & Roth 401(k) – The Basics

Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k) plans are incredibly popular, and why wouldn’t they be? Both offer tax-free earnings and allow the account owner to pass tax-free dollars to their beneficiaries. However, despite the ubiquity of Roth accounts, there are some common misunderstandings about how Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k)s operate and interact with each other. Confusion swirls around such basic concepts as contribution limits, eligibility and Roth rollovers. For example, income limits apply to Roth IRA contributions only There are no income limits for designated Roth 401(k) plan salary deferrals. Contributions are the initial building block of Roth IRAs.

Best Thing Since Sliced Bread?

Roth IRAs are a wonderful way to save for retirement. A person can sock away $6,000 a year (plus another $1,000 if they are age 50 or older) and the earnings will grow tax free. Plus, most custodians allow Roth IRA dollars to be invested in an incredibly wide array of options – mutual funds, stocks, ETFs - a veritable smorgasbords of choices. Can’t beat that with a stick! Did I mention that Roth IRAs have no required minimum distributions at age 70 ½? (Put that in the “pro-Roth” column.) What about age restrictions on who can contribute? You’re telling me that anyone can contribute to a Roth IRA as long as they have earned income and do not exceed certain income limits?

Roth IRA Rollovers and Contributions: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: I set up a Roth outside my employee retirement plan. I retired on 10-01-2018. I set up an automatic contribution to my Roth IRA from my checking account and, up to this day, still continue to contribute to the Roth IRA . Shall I opt out since I’m retired now? Your advice is deeply appreciated. Thank you very much. Sincerely, Ester Answer: Hi Ester, Contributing to a Roth IRA in addition to your employer plan is a great way to increase your retirement savings.

The Time Machine

A time machine would be cool to have. Even if it only worked on financial assets, it sure would come in handy. One might jump into the future and see if an investment paid off, or you could look around to see where the smart money succeeded. And if the original investment turned out to be a loser, you could go back in time and sell it – or never even buy it in the first place. Too bad financial time machines don’t exist. Bummer. While literal time machines have yet to be invented and we can’t quantum leap,

Commingling Inherited Assets and QCDs: Today’s Q&A Mailbag

This week's Slott Report Mailbag answers readers' questions about commingling assets and QCDs.

Tracking Roth Contributions for Those Under Age 59½

One of the benefits of a Roth IRA is that contributions can always be distributed out of the Roth IRA with no tax, and no early distribution penalty for those that are under age 59½. But, you have to be able to prove to IRS that you are taking a distribution of contributions only. Under the distribution ordering rules, all Roth IRAs are treated as one Roth account, contributions are deemed to be the first amount distributed, then conversions – first in, first out – and lastly earnings are distributed.

5 Roth IRA Facts That May Surprise You

Do you think you understand all the rules that govern your Roth IRA? Not so fast! There are many misconceptions as to how these complicated accounts work. Here are 5 Roth IRA facts that might surprise you.

Roth IRA Contributions and RMD Rules: Today’s Q&A Mailbag

This week's Slott Report Mailbag answers readers' questions about Roth IRA contributions and RMD rules.

Happy 20th Birthday Roth IRA! – Here Are 20 Roth IRA Facts You Need to Know

The year 1998 seems like a long time ago. In January 1998, Bill Clinton was in the White House and about to be impeached. The Unabomber was in the news and the Spice Girls were winning music awards. January 1, 1998 also brought us the launch of Roth IRA. However, unlike other ‘90’s memories, the Roth IRA is still going, stronger than ever. You may already be reaping the tax benefits of your own Roth IRA. Or, maybe you’ve hesitated to open one. The 20th anniversary may be the time for you to take the plunge. To celebrate the occasion, here are 20 Roth facts you need to know.

Tax Reform Targets Your Ability to Undo Your Roth IRA Conversion

Recharacterization is currently one of the few “do-overs” allowed under the tax code. Its days may now be numbered. The tax reform legislation currently pending in Congress would do away with recharacterization at the end of 2017.

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