Will I Be Affected By The Once-Per-Year IRA Rollover Rule? | Ed Slott and Company, LLC

Will I Be Affected By The Once-Per-Year IRA Rollover Rule?

ed slott IRA questions

By Joe Cicchinelli and Beverly DeVeny
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This week's Slott Report Mailbag inquires about the new once-per-year IRA rollover rule as well as the tax implications on an IRA-to-Roth IRA conversion. As always, we recommend you work with a competent, educated financial advisor to keep your retirement nest egg safe and secure. You can find one in your area here.

1.

I had withdrawn $130,000 from my IRA last year, and in December 2014, re-deposited $30,000 for a 60-day rollover. In January 2015, I withdrew $12,600. I do not need the funds. Can I re-deposit again with a 60-day rollover or am I affected by the 12-month rule?

Answer:
You are affected by the 12-month rule if the $12,600 distribution came from the IRA that either distributed the $130,00 or received the $130,000 as a rollover. In that case, the January 2015 distribution is not rollover eligible and is taxable. We've covered the new once-per-year rollover rules in great detail within February's IRA Focus and we list out the exceptions to the new rule in this Slott Report article.

2.

I am retired, and in 2015 I will have very little income. I am considering converting my traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. I only want to convert an amount that keeps me below the 25% tax bracket. I am 58.

My questions:

  1. For tax planning purposes, are the traditional IRA dollars converted to the Roth IRA taxed in the same way as ordinary income would be taxed? If yes, can I plug converted dollars into an income tax software program as W-2 income to estimate my tax liability incorporating deductions and AGI (adjusted gross income)?
  2. Will any Social Security or Medicare tax be due on the conversion?

Answer:
The conversion is taxed as ordinary income, but there is no 10% penalty on the conversion even though you are under age 59 ½. You should check with the tax software provider on where you should input the conversion amount. Normally it goes in as an IRA distribution. Roth IRA conversions are counted in the formula for figuring the taxation on Social Security because it raises your adjusted gross income. The income from a Roth conversion can impact the amount of premium an individual has to pay for Medicare Part B coverage.

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