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401K

More 401(k) SECURE 2.0 Changes Already in Effect – And On the Way

By now, you probably know that a number of SECURE 2.0 provisions pertaining to 401(k) (and other company savings plans) became effective this year. We’ve already discussed two of them in The Slott Report. The first is that Roth 401(k) accounts, like Roth IRAs, are now exempt from RMDs.

Roth Conversions and Inherited IRAs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

QUESTION: If an individual has both an IRA and a 401(k) and wants to convert the IRA to a Roth IRA, does he have to take both the IRA and the 401(k) RMD (required minimum distribution) before doing a Roth conversion? Thanks for your kind attention.

How the Contribution Limits Work When You’re in Two Plans

The start of the new year is a good time for a refresher course on the contribution limits that apply when someone is in two different retirement plans at the same time or at different times within the same year (e.g., after changing jobs). The rules are challenging because there are two different contribution limits to worry about – the “elective deferral limit” and the “overall contribution limit.”

How the Contribution Limits Work When You’re in Two Plans

The start of the new year is a good time for a refresher course on the contribution limits that apply when someone is in two different retirement plans at the same time or at different times within the same year (e.g., after changing jobs). The rules are challenging because there are two different contribution limits to worry about – the “elective deferral limit” and the “overall contribution limit.”

IRS Issues Helpful Guidance on Roth 401(k) Employer Contributions

On December 20, 2023, the IRS issued Notice 2024-02, which includes guidance on 12 provisions of the SECURE 2.0 legislation. The December 27 Slott Report, written by Sarah Brenner, has a summary of the guidance on several of those provisions. This article will address the guidance on Roth employer contributions to 401(k) and other plans.

Backdoor Roth IRA Baggage

We hear it all the time. “If your income is too high for a direct Roth IRA contribution, just do a Backdoor Roth. Easy-peasy!” Not so fast, my friend. A Backdoor Roth IRA transaction is like a musclebound hotel bellhop – it can carry a lot of baggage. However, before we can discuss said baggage…

NEW ROTH PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE IN 2024

When the bell dropped in Times Square last Sunday night, a bunch of new provisions from the SECURE 2.0 legislation kicked in. This article will focus on the Roth-related changes that are effective in 2024.

SECURE 2.0 RELAXS RETROACTIVE SOLO 401(k) RULES

Thinking of opening up a new solo 401(k) plan for 2023? Thanks to SECURE 2.0, you don’t have to rush to get it done by year end. A solo 401(k) is an excellent retirement savings vehicle for self-employed business owners with no employees (other than their spouse). That’s because the IRS says that a business owner with a solo (k) actually wears two hats – one as an employee and one as an employer. As an employee, he can make elective deferrals up to $22,500 for 2023, or $30,000 if age 50 or older.

Congress Makes SIMPLE IRA Plans Less SIMPLE

SIMPLE IRA plans are a popular retirement savings option for small businesses. The plans are available for companies with 100 or fewer employees who received at least $5,000 in pay from the company in the prior year. SIMPLE IRAs are designed to be administratively easier than 401(k) plans. Businesses can establish a SIMPLE by completing a model IRS form (either Form 5305-SIMPLE or 5304 SIMPLE) and can make contributions directly to employees’ IRAs.

The Still-Working Exception: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: We had a client who was 80 years old and still working when he died. He did not own more than 5% of the company. As such, he was not taking required minimum distributions (RMDs) from the plan at his death. Our client named his son as his sole beneficiary.

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