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Ian berger

A Way to Jump-Start 529-to-Roth Rollovers

We have covered in The Slott Report the new SECURE 2.0 provision that allows unused 529 plan funds to be rolled over to Roth IRAs. It originally appeared that this new rule was to be effective for 2024. However, the IRS has now said that rollovers done before April 15, 2024 can count as Roth IRA contributions for tax year 2023 if the 529 beneficiary has not already maxed out on his 2023 IRA contribution limit.

THE PRO-RATA RULE AND INHERITED IRA RMDS: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: I was given your information by a financial advisor who follows your articles. I have a unique situation with a client who is a high earner with several old 401(k) accounts. My idea was to have her fund an IRA with a contribution for 2023 and 2024. Then I was going to have her do the Roth conversion with no tax liability. She currently has no IRAs. My question is: If I roll over her 401(k)s later in 2024, would she still be subject to the pro-rata rule? When I contacted my back office, they said that at the time of conversion she will not have an IRA, so she should be all set. However, my thought is that the pro-rata rule applies on a calendar year basis, so she would be subject to the pro-rata IRA rule.

More 401(k) SECURE 2.0 Changes Already in Effect – And On the Way

By now, you probably know that a number of SECURE 2.0 provisions pertaining to 401(k) (and other company savings plans) became effective this year. We’ve already discussed two of them in The Slott Report. The first is that Roth 401(k) accounts, like Roth IRAs, are now exempt from RMDs.

BACKDOOR ROTH IRA CONVERSIONS AND THE ANNUAL RMD REQUIREMENT: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: Is it possible to do a Backdoor Roth IRA conversion with a SEP IRA? If yes, how does it work? Thank you! Yulia

How the Contribution Limits Work When You’re in Two Plans

The start of the new year is a good time for a refresher course on the contribution limits that apply when someone is in two different retirement plans at the same time or at different times within the same year (e.g., after changing jobs). The rules are challenging because there are two different contribution limits to worry about – the “elective deferral limit” and the “overall contribution limit.”

How the Contribution Limits Work When You’re in Two Plans

The start of the new year is a good time for a refresher course on the contribution limits that apply when someone is in two different retirement plans at the same time or at different times within the same year (e.g., after changing jobs). The rules are challenging because there are two different contribution limits to worry about – the “elective deferral limit” and the “overall contribution limit.”

IRS Issues Helpful Guidance on Roth 401(k) Employer Contributions

On December 20, 2023, the IRS issued Notice 2024-02, which includes guidance on 12 provisions of the SECURE 2.0 legislation. The December 27 Slott Report, written by Sarah Brenner, has a summary of the guidance on several of those provisions. This article will address the guidance on Roth employer contributions to 401(k) and other plans.

RMD CALCULATION AND TRUSTS FOR DISABLED BENEFICIARIES: TODAY’S SLOTT REORT MAILBAG

Question: Hoping you can help with this technical question. I am over 73. My traditional IRA balance as of 12/31/22 was $0.00. I made a $7,500 non-deductible traditional IRA contribution in 2023 and converted the full balance ($7,508.23, including $8.23 of interest) to a Roth IRA in 2023. I did not do an RMD prior to the conversion, but I did not have a traditional IRA balance at the end of 2022 and my 2023 traditional IRA contribution was non-deductible.

NEW ROTH PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE IN 2024

When the bell dropped in Times Square last Sunday night, a bunch of new provisions from the SECURE 2.0 legislation kicked in. This article will focus on the Roth-related changes that are effective in 2024.

SECURE 2.0 RELAXS RETROACTIVE SOLO 401(k) RULES

Thinking of opening up a new solo 401(k) plan for 2023? Thanks to SECURE 2.0, you don’t have to rush to get it done by year end. A solo 401(k) is an excellent retirement savings vehicle for self-employed business owners with no employees (other than their spouse). That’s because the IRS says that a business owner with a solo (k) actually wears two hats – one as an employee and one as an employer. As an employee, he can make elective deferrals up to $22,500 for 2023, or $30,000 if age 50 or older.

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