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uniform lifetime table

RMDs Under SECURE Act 2.0: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: On reading your SECURE 2.0 information, a revised RMD (required minimum distribution) to age 73 was mentioned. Prior to this new legislation, 72 was the RMD age. If this is in effect now in 2023, is it correct that if you turn 72 in 2023, you won’t be required to take an RMD in 2023? Based on what I’ve read, the first RMD for a 72 year-old in 2023 would be pushed to age 73 in 2024? Thanks in advance for your insights!

New 2022 IRS Life Expectancy Tables Available Here

The IRS has released new life expectancy tables for calculating required minimum distributions (RMDs) for 2022. The most commonly used tables are the Uniform Lifetime and the Single Life Expectancy Tables. The Uniform Lifetime Table is used by most IRA owners who need to take 2022 lifetime RMDs.

What Life Expectancy Table Should I Use?

IRS does not have a crystal ball. Its team members don't know how long you are going to live. The life expectancy tables are based on statistics and do not take into account any of your personal information. Read on to discover what life expectancy table you should be using and how each works.

Does My RMD Calculation Table Change Based on Who is Named My Primary Beneficiary?

This week's Slott Report Mailbag looks at required minimum distribution (RMD) calculations for primary beneficiaries (depending on who is named) and answers a complex question on RMD issues when inheriting an inherited IRA.

8 Things to Know About Special Spousal Rule That Allows Smaller RMDs

If you have a traditional IRA and are age 70 ½ or older this year, you will have to take a required minimum distribution (RMD) from your IRA for 2015. Your 2015 RMD is calculated by dividing your December 31, 2014 IRA balance by a life expectancy factor. You can determine your life expectancy factor by using life expectancy tables issued by the IRS. You will most likely use the Uniform Lifetime Table except when this special spousal rule applies.

Slott Report Mailbag: What Can I Do If My Husband Didn't List an IRA Beneficiary?

Come rain, sleet, or in this case, a Nor'easter of snow, we still deliver The Slott Report Mailbag with questions about IRA required minimum distributions (RMDs), beneficiaries when one wasn't listed (hint: the spouse isn't automatically the beneficiary) and the Roth IRA conversion rules.

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