The Slott Report | Ed Slott and Company, LLC

The Slott Report

ROTH IRA CONTRIBUTIONS AND QCDs: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: I am 72 years old and have a Roth IRA. I have some extra cash in a bank account. Can I put that into my Roth IRA and how much can I contribute for 2021?

The Mega Backdoor Roth IRA Strategy and Solo 401(k) Plans

In the August 16, 2021 Slott Report, we showed that someone participating in a 401(k) plan through a “regular” job could also establish a solo 401(k) plan through a side job and potentially contribute up to $58,000 this year in after-tax contributions to the solo plan. However, this only works if the company sponsoring the regular 401(k) plan and the entity sponsoring the solo 401(k) (e.g., a sole proprietor) are considered unrelated under IRS rules.

Aggregating RMDs – What Is (and What is Not) Allowed

Recently, I had a conversation with an advisor who wanted a second opinion. He disagreed with how a 401(k) custodian was handling his client’s required minimum distribution (RMD). To arm himself with facts, the advisor contacted us so he could push back on that custodian.

The 10-Year Rule and IRA Beneficiaries: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: Ed, My client recently passed away at the age of 86 and the beneficiaries were his twin grandchildren who are six years old. Does their 10-year clock to withdraw the funds start right away, or can they wait until they are 18 years old to start their 10-year clock to withdraw the funds?

10 Things to Know About ESAs

It’s back to school time! Any parent will tell you that education can be expensive. You cannot afford to miss out on any possible option out there that may help you save. One savings tool that you might overlook is the Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA). Here are 10 things you need to know about ESAs.

Making Sense of the 401(k) Multiple Plan Limits

We continue to get lots of questions about the company savings plan contribution limits. There are actually two different contribution limits – the “deferral limit” and the “overall limit.” This makes things very confusing, especially if you’re in multiple plans at the same time or you change jobs in the middle of the year.

Backdoor Roth IRAs and Missed RMDs: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: I read of a way to move money from an IRA to a Roth without incurring any taxes. You set up an IRA account and make a non-deductible contribution of $6,000, then you convert it into a Roth. Is this legal and possible? Thanks!

Update Your Beneficiary Forms!

Regardless of whether you open an IRA, participate in a 401(k) plan, buy a life insurance policy, or start a college saving plan for a child, there is a critical detail which should never be overlooked: naming a beneficiary. Typically, the account application will include a space for doing just that. Sometimes a second form may be required when a person wants to change an existing beneficiary.

Your QCD Questions Answered

A Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD) is a way for you to move funds out of your IRA to a qualifying charity income tax free. This can be a great strategy for those who are charitably inclined and looking to save on taxes. Here are the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about QCDs. How old do you have to be to take a QCD? IRA owners who are age 70½ and over are eligible to do a QCD. Sounds easy, right? This is more complicated than it might sound. A QCD is only allowed if the distribution is made on or after the date you actually attain age 70 ½. It is not enough that you will attain that age later in the year.

ROTH IRAS FOR CHILDREN AND ROLLOVERS OF RMDS: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: Can you put funds into a Roth IRA for a 14 year old using money you have paid the child for doing chores? Client was told all he needed to do was keep a record of what was paid by to the child. I have always enjoyed your presentations. Thank you, Cathy
 

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