The Slott Report | Ed Slott and Company, LLC

The Slott Report

When a “Reverse Rollover” Makes Sense

Usually, rollovers involving 401(k) accounts and IRAs involve moving dollars from a plan to an IRA. But sometimes it makes sense to instead do a “reverse rollover” – from an IRA to a 401(k). Let’s get some bad news out of the way: Although 401(k)s (and other company plans) are required to allow rollovers out of the plan, they are not required to allow rollovers into the plan. So, before withdrawing your IRA, check with your plan administrator or HR to make sure you can do a reverse rollover. Also, the tax code only allows reverse rollovers of pre-tax (deductible) IRA funds. Roth IRA funds and after-tax (non-deductible) IRA accounts are not eligible.

Moving Non-IRA Accounts and the Proposed RMD Regulations: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

Question: I am 79 and make SEP-IRA withdrawals annually as required. I also have several regular (non-IRA) accounts. One fund I own throws off tremendous taxable capital gains every year. Is there any way I can move it into an IRA account without selling it first in a taxable transaction? Thanks.

Joe & Lucy – Different Rules Within the 10-Year Period

Some of the proposed SECURE Act regulations, released in February, are convoluted and unnecessary. We have made our opinions known. Fortunately, many of the confounding new rules – several of which we have written about – will be limited in their impact. However, a new discovery could affect a larger percentage of IRA and 401(k) beneficiaries. The combination of a few basic principles may lead to inherited IRA confusion. Does order + order = chaos? Example: Joe, age 75, has a traditional IRA (“IRA X”). Joe dies and leaves the IRA to his daughter Lucy. Lucy does NOT qualify to stretch payments as an eligible designated beneficiary (EDB) over her lifetime, so she must apply the 10-year rule. The entire IRA must be emptied by the end of the tenth year after the year of death. Additionally, Joe died after his required beginning date (“RBD” – April 1 of the year after he turned 72), so Lucy must also take required minimum distributions (RMDs) in years 1 – 9 of the 10 years.

Watch out for the Once-Per-Year Rollover Rule

Why is it so important to know how the once-per-year rollover rule works? Well, that is because trouble with the once-per year rule is the kind of trouble no one wants! An IRA owner who violates this rule is looking at some serious tax consequences.

THE RULE-OF-55 AND RMD CONVERSIONS: TODAY’S SLOTT REPORT MAILBAG

Question: Hi, I am age 50 and am targeting retirement at age 55. My current employer is selling the division I work for, and I see the potential that I could be laid off at, say, 52. If this were to happen, could I join a new employer with a 401(k) plan, roll my old 401(k) over to the new plan, and then take a distribution (both the rolled-over funds and the new 401(k) funds) under the rule of 55? The statute suggests that I could do this, but I have seen comments that the rollover funds wouldn't count.

How the Vesting Rules Work for Company Retirement Plans

Employees leaving their jobs are often surprised to discover they aren’t entitled to the full balance of their company plan account. The reason is that some plans impose a vesting rule on certain types of contributions. What do the vesting rules mean? They tell you how much of your plan benefit you actually own and cannot be taken away from you. If you’re fully vested, you’re entitled to your entire benefit. If partially vested, you only get a portion of your benefit.

Ed Slott's Elite IRA Advisor Group℠ Topics of Conversation - Kansas City

Last week in Kansas City, the Ed Slott team hosted our first in-person training program for members of our Elite Advisor Group since late 2019. While we managed to stay in contact with everyone via virtual meetings for the last two years, it was good to again see people face-to-face. The conversations were lively and interaction among the members during the breaks was spirited.

Qualified Charitable Distributions & Spousal Beneficiaries: Today's Slott Report Mailbag

By Andy Ives, CFP®, AIF®
IRA Analyst
Follow Us on Twitter: 
@theslottreport


Question:

I have a 401(k) that I'd like to use a portion for a QCD. I understand that QCD's have to be from an IRA. Can I move a portion to an IRA for the QCD? How will this affect my RMD from my 401(k)? Federal tax implications? Thank you!

Answer:

How Your IRA Can Help if You Are a First-Time Home Buyer

The real estate market is red hot right now. This can be especially challenging for first time home buyers. IRA savings are intended to be used for your retirement. However, if you are like many others, your IRA may be your biggest asset. You may need your IRA funds to make home ownership happen and there is a special break in the tax code that can help you.

IRS Needs to Clarify Annual RMD Requirement under the New Regulations

Just when we thought we understood the new IRS regulations on required minimum distributions (RMDs), here comes more uncertainty. As we have reported, the IRS threw everyone a curveball with its interpretation of the 10-year payout rule under the SECURE Act in its proposed regulations issued on February 23. For most non-spouse beneficiaries, the SECURE Act replaced the life expectancy payout rule (also known as the “stretch IRA”) with a new 10-year rule. It is clear that the 10-year rule requires that the entire IRA account be emptied by December 31 of the 10th year following the year the IRA owner died.
 

Find members of Ed Slott's Elite IRA Advisor GroupSM in your area.
We neither keep nor share your information entered on this form.
 

I agree to the terms and services:

You may review the terms and conditions here.